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U.S. Constitution: Constitution Resources

Celebrate the US Constitution on Constitution Day, September 17th 2020

U.S. History Pictures

Let Us Raise A Standard To Which The Wise And The Honest Can Repair -- George Washington.

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. Let Us Raise A Standard To Which The Wise And The Honest Can Repair -- George Washington. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-31f4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Immigrants seated on long benches, Main Hall, U.S. Immigration Station

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. (1902 - 1913). Immigrants seated on long benches, Main Hall, U.S. Immigration Station. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47da-d8d7-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Presentation of colors to 5th U.S. Colored Troops, Camp Delaware, Ohio, 1803

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library. (1894). Presentation of colors to 5th U.S. Colored Troops, Camp Delaware, Ohio, 1803. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47df-964e-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Quizzes

Constitution Day @ The Pennsylvania Institute of Technology

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                          

On September 17, 1787, the Founding Fathers signed the most influential document in American history, the United States Constitution. This document established the framework of our government and the rights and freedoms that “We the People” enjoy today.                                          

National Constitution Center - Interactive Constitution

The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8

In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided to try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is.

  • Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/artic... When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-b...